12 August 2010

New articles on carbon trading

A bit of cross-promotion here... a series of new articles on carbon trading, from the Carbon trade Watch newsletter

Carbon market “growth” is mainly fraudulent, World Bank report shows

The global carbon market grew in 2009. Far from signalling a success, this reflects a massive increase in fraud, the dumping of surplus emissions permits by industry, and a rise in financial speculation.

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Creating new from the old: how the REDD+ Partnership plans to create a REDD market, plus!
The REDD+ Partnership intends to facilitate controversial forest payment schemes in advance of any UN climate agreement on an international framework to tackling deforestation.

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Industrial gases in CDM: fixing a hole?
The majority of Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) offset credits issued to date are bogus, according to new research on industrial gas destruction projects.

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The UN Boys Club tasked with redefining climate finance
Climate finance is a central element to any future international framework for tackling climate change, but a closed-door UN panel could redefine the terms of the debate away from the responsibilities of industrialised countries and encourage the further expansion of carbon markets.

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More on Plantar as the struggle continues
The Plantar project was one of the first to be supported by the World Bank Prototype Carbon Fund (PCF). Some aspects of the project have since entered the Clean Development Mechanism, but the battle continues to keep more of this plantation scheme out of the CDM.

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New Zealand's new carbon market: a taxpayer subsidy for plantations and energy companies
New Zealand has a new carbon market, the first national scheme to be launched outside Europe. It looks set to award profits to forest plantation owners, help power companies avoid emissions reductions, and pass the costs of tackling climate change from big business to individual consumers.

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